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So You Think You Have a Van Gogh

A major Vincent Van Gogh painting would easily sell for a $100 million dollars. Because of this, numerous art collectors have been “scouring” flea markets and antique shops hoping to find their own Van Gogh. The idea is not as far fetched as you may think. After Van Gogh’s death, his mother dumped dozens of paintings and drawings at a local flea market to eliminate her son’s lesser work. Most were unsigned. Occasionally a Van Gogh turns up.

Van Gogh’s work is not easily authenticated. He painted in five styles (Dutch, French Impressionist, Arles, Saint Remy and Auvers periods). Each one unique. There is not much difference in the age of them as Van Gogh only painted seven years. To add more confusion, he frequently copied other artists’ styles (Pissarro, Seurat) and other artists’ paintings (Millet, Daumier). Although totally ignored in his lifetime, after his suicide, Van Gogh paintings began to bring big prices. The first forgeries appeared within five years of Van Gogh’s death.

A little known fact is Van Gogh had at least two students that painted in his style. Their works often are confused with his. They have same Van Gogh subjects, paint and canvas.

The good news is Van Gogh is more carefully documented than almost any other artist. Hundreds of Vincent’s letters describing what he was working on still exist.

If you have a work that appears to be by Van Gogh, just send to us a photo of it. We’ll examine it and write back and say if it has a chance of being an authentic Van Gogh and what our fee would be to research it. (Minimum $895.00).

We’re the only art appraiser that regularly travels to Amsterdam to work in the Van Gogh Museum Library. We’re there about every 2-3 months.

No one has more experience with Van Gogh. We take photos of your work to carefully compare with documented Van Gogh masterpieces.

Why not phone us today and discuss your Van Gogh project. We’ll be glad to give you a free assessment over the phone. Unknown Van Gogh paintings and Van Gogh drawings do appear.

Click to visit our page Honesty Is So Rare.
Click to visit our page Illinois Bar Association Recomendation.
  Click to visit our Van Gogh: Secrets the other Art Apraisers Don't Know page.
Click to visit our Cutting Edge Painting Authentication page.
Click to visit our Laboratory Testing page.
Click to visit our Unsigned Paintings And Sculptures page.
Click to visit our page Collector's Guide to Scientific Lab Art Tests.
Click to visit our Painting Appraisals page.


What are the Risks and Rewards?

The world auction record for an oil painting is over $100 million.  It was for a Van Gogh.  Many Van Goghs regularly sell for over $25 million.

A poor copy of a Van Gogh still sells for $5,000-$10,000.  Collectors who can’t afford an original eagerly search for these.  A painting in Van Gogh’s style still sells for many times our reasonable research and appraisal fee.  If your Van Gogh is not worth at least 3 times our fee, we won’t risk your money.  That’s a promise!


Are there lost Van Gogh’s?

The Van Gogh museum archives mentions, in 1895, Van Gogh’s mother, left with a carpenter in Breda, Holland, several large cases of drawings and paintings that belonged to her deceased son.  After several years the carpenter sold everything at the local flea market.  Numerous drawings and paintings then disappeared.  Occasionally Van Gogh’s appear on the market with this Breda provenance.

 


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Witness Van Gogh
Become Insane!
Vincent Van Gogh starts as young art salesman in the first photograph. He later takes up painting and does numerous self-portraits in the seven years he painted.

We collected photos from our extensive files of Van Gogh paintings. We placed these in chronological order. You can watch him become angrier, distrustful and finally go completely insane. He was confined to a mental institution and committed suicide right after the last portrait. The power and honesty of these paintings are incredible.

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